Danaher Says

DANAHER SAYS

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Danaher says:


Get a good bite on the leg: Probably the single most common error I see young athletes make when entering into cross ashi garami to get an inside heel hook from bottom position is failure to rise up from the floor high enough to capture the leg close to the hip. Don’t be satisfied with getting to your opponents knee – when he resists he will only have to slip the knee an inch or two and he’s out. Come up off the floor and get the lock of your cross ashi garami up high by the hip. This will give you a deep bite on the leg that will prove very difficult for an opponent to extricate himself from. In addition it will make it easier to off balance the opponent to create better breaking conditions

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