Taking yourself to a new level

Taking yourself to a new level - front headlocks and the example of Craig Jones: At any given time our game is certain level. This can change a little week by week depending upon training conditions and the state of our body, but there is a rough level that can be roughly measured by your skill set/knowledge and how you stack up against other athletes in sparring/competition. Once you can to a level that you find satisfactory it’s natural to take stock of yourself and see yourself as having a certain type of game. Both you and Your classmates have a good idea of what your strengths and weaknesses are. You see yourself as being good at moves A,B and C but not very interested in E and F. You take that skill set of yours and refine it a little and that’s you. You can do pretty well with this approach - but you will never reach your potential. You have to periodically set projects to add whole new aspects to your game. This is the only way to avoid stagnation over time. Take the example of Craig Jones. Early in his career he was known primarily for his triangle attacks. When he came to America to compete in EBI events he realized he had to excel in the leg lock game. He took that project on with such gusto that he became known as one of the best in the world. Not satisfied, he went on to develop a very powerful back attack in response to opponents who ran from the pressure of his leg game. Watching his development a few years ago i talked with him about the need to develop a powerful front headlock/Guillotine game as a counter to opponents who did not want to engage his dangerous submissions game or who were faster than him in a scramble. Immediately he took the project on. Within a short time he was developing lethal variations of Guillotines, anacondas and Darce strangles. Then tying these back to his already formidable back game and leg game. Now he has one of the best front headlock games I’ve ever seen! THIS is how you keep developing. NEVER SEE YOURSELF AS A COMPLETED PROJECT. Rather than cover up and hide your weaknesses - train them to become your new strengths and ally them to your old strengths.


Aim high

Aim high: The single biggest obstacle to the learning and improving process is LOW EXPECTATIONS AND STANDARDS AMONG THOSE SEEKING IMPROVEMENT. A huge part of realizing your potential in Jiu Jitsu and indeed anything else in life, is your ability to form a culture of high standards and great expectations around yourself. Days where you exhibit a “that’s good enough” mentality are days wasted. Always ask the better question - “is my performance of this technique good enough to win a world championship.” Just that switch in mindset from “is this good enough to get by?” to “is this good enough to work on a world champion?” Will immediately drive you to better performance of that move. THE FIRST STEP TOWARDS HIGHER PERFORMANCE AGAINST OTHERS IS HIGHER STANDARDS AND EXPECTATIONS WITHIN YOURSELF. Make a habit of comparing yourself to ever greater standards and you will soon see improvement in your technique